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Weird Website Searches

 

Currently topping the is the Sars virus, war in Iraq and populist subjects such David Beckham and pop singer Avril Lavigne.

Now MSN, Microsoft's net portal, has compiled a list of the popular search terms that only a of people, in some cases only one, have looked .

The list provides a slightly unsettling insight the lives of a few British web users who are information on some very esoteric .

Odd hobby

At top of the list is the phrase "walking with woodlice" which sounds strange but is a real site run Britain's Natural History Museum.

It perhaps some of its inspiration from the BBC's series programmes that give the viewer a new of life during the heyday of the dinosaurs, cavemen and ancient beasts.

The list of least searched for terms the curious hobbies of some Britons, with people looking rules to play croquet in nude or for fellow black pudding flingers.

Novel hobbies, as making walking sticks or hedgehog houses, seem to effect some searches.

Others seem to be prompted a particular event.

The person looking information on "canary euthanasia" may have suffered a domestic tragedy and was looking for a humane way to help a pet depart world.

Another unforeseen incident could have someone search for guidance on the best way clean their crystal ball.

And was looking for information about ham sandwich digestion may have been bored while eating lunch.

of the other rare searches are simply bizarre.

Quite what those looking "virtual geese honking" or "origami for emus" actually wanted help with hard to guess.

" everyone is into hard news, hot celebrities and soap gossip," Robert McInnery, MSN search marketing manager.

 

 

adapted from a true story

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